Welcome to our walking blog. The aim of this blog is to give readers a further insight into walking in Northern Ireland. The blog will cover everything from seasonal walking suggestions and events to information on how to best practice ‘Leave No Trace’ techniques and walk responsibly in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. We will also be inviting local accomplished mountaineers and industry experts to give their thoughts and opinions into Northern Ireland top walking spots and other trails more off the beaten track.

For your definitive guide to walking in Northern Ireland visit www.walkni.com

Little Hills with Big Views

Posted on September 19, 2017 @ 11:49 AM in Walking

A chance for you to experience mountain top views and spectacular scenery without too much of a climb!  You don't always have to summit the highest peaks to see the best sights; there are lots of exciting little hills with big views across Northern Ireland waiting for you to explore. Here are our top short walks (under 5 miles) with fantastic views.

Slievenaslat Trail, Castlewellan Forest Park, Co. Down

2.7 miles circular

Castlewellan Forest Park

Located in Castlewellan Forest Park in the foothills of the spectacular Mourne Mountains, climb through the forest at your own pace enjoying a series of viewpoints offering panoramic views of the Mournes, Castlewellan Castle & lake as well as the surrounding drumlin landscape of Co Down. There is a steep section at the start of this walk but what goes up must come down and it is definitely worth it!  The route takes place on hilly woodland trails and includes steps in sections.

Cloughmore Stone, Rostrevor, Co. Down

0.4 miles linear (one way)

Cloughmore Stone

Located 230m above sea level the walk to Cloughmore Stone provides spectacular views of the surrounding forest and over Carlingford Lough. The area has been declared a National Nature Reserve and more recently an Area of Special Scientific Interest. The trail is moderate with a short steep uphill section - a great one to encourage the kids on for a first climb! 

Avish to Eagles Hill, Co. Derry~Londonderry

3.1 miles circular

Manannan Mac Lir

A refreshing walk along the cliff top overlooking Benone Beach, Lough Foyle and the Inishowen Peninsula in Co. Donegal. This walk begins from Gortmore Point where the sculpture of Manannan Mac Lir, a sea God originating from this area can be viewed. The trail follows cliff top and trails through open field and quiet country lanes.

Viewpoint Trail, Glenariff Forest Park, Co. Antrim

0.6 miles circular

Glenariff

Image of Glenariff by Tim Gaston on Twitter: @tgaston42

This short walk through woodland and stunning gardens offers spectacular views across 1 of the 9 Glens of Antrim. Located in the heart of the Glens of Antrim there are lots of places to explore in Glenariff Forest Park including a series of spectacular waterfalls. This walk follows forest paths which are steep in places.

Scrabo Hill, Newtownards, Co. Down

2.3 miles circular

Scrabo Hill

Built in 1857 Scrabo Tower is one of Ireland's best known landmarks. The views from the top of Scrabo hill over Strangford Lough and North Down are some of the finest in the country. Follow the trail as it descends into the disused sandstone quaries which provided building stone since Anglo-Norman times. The old quarries have major geological importance and have been designated an Area of Special Scientific Interest. The walk follows tarmac and off road paths which are steep in places.

Magho Cliffs Walk, Lough Navar Forest, Co. Fermanagh

1.3 miles linear (one way)

Lough Navar Forest Park

Part of the Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, this walk takes you across the tops of the Magho Cliffs which offer great panoramic views of the surrounding area. The walk returns along the cliff top path twisting and winding its way through the woodland. The trail is made of compact gravel with steps and cross drains in places.

Divis Summit Trail, Belfast, Co. Antrim

3 miles circular

Divis Mountain

Offering spectacular panoramaic views over Belfast, Divis is the highest summit in the Belfast Hills. The walk which takes place on stone pitching is designed to maintain the condition of the mountain slope while providing public access. There is lots to explore in this location including the Ridge trail and stopping by the Long Barn Cafe managed by the National Trust for a cup of coffee after your walk.

Latest comment posted by Ronnie Irvine on September 24, 2017 @ 9:15 AM

Nice selection, Jane. Some Tyrone/Derry ones? Slieve Gallion summit, Mullaghmore, Crockmore & Crockbrack, Maybe a little higher but all have fairly short walks to the tops if required. ....and ... Read more >

Jayne Woodrow
Jayne Woodrow  Marketing Executive

Jayne joined the marketing team of Outdoor Recreation NI in March 2014. She enjoys getting out and exploring the fantastic adventures on offer across Northern Ireland.

Discover The Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark- Our Top 10 Walks

Posted on August 14, 2017 @ 10:42 AM in AdventureWalking

The Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark in Co. Fermanagh is well known for one of the finest show caves in Europe, but did you know there is more to this location than the caves?! The Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark contains some of the finest landscapes in the north of Ireland with wonderful walkins in Fermanagh and Cavan ranging from rugged uplands, lakes and forests through to gently rolling drumlins. The landscapes represent a complex earth history dating back as far as 895 million years ago and can be explored on foot. Here are some of our must visit walks in the Co. Fermanagh region of the Geopark.

Walks under 5 milesBelmore Forest

Belmore Forest (Pollnagollum Cave Walk), 4.3 miles circular
This walk is located in the Boho-Belmore Mountain area, right in the heart of Fermanagh’s cave country. Beneath your feet lies an extensive maze of caves which attract cavers and potholers from far and wide to west Fermanagh. The most extraordinary feature on this route is Pollnagollum Cave, Irish for "Hole of the doves". The cave is fed by a waterfall toppling down from the top of a limstone cliff and is swollen to a torrent during harsh weather. Depending on the time of day and year keep a watchful eye out for bats and birds around the cave entrance.

Big Dog Forest

Big Dog Forest (Big Dog Walk) 2.5 miles circular
Cloaked largely with conifers, this beautiful short walk allows you to explore some of Fermanagh’s best upland landscapes. The forest is inhabited by wildlife as varied as red deer, herons and dragonflies. One of the highlights of this walk is the short but rewarding climb to the summit of Little Dog where you will be rewarded with 360 degree panoramic views of the surrounding area.

Castle Archdale Toms Island

Castle Archdale Forest (Toms Island Walk) 1.8 miles circular
Located on the eastern shores of Lower Lough Erne, this walk takes in many differing landscapes and offers something for everyone. The magestic Tom's Island boasts great views across the lough to White Island and Davy's Island. This trail also skirts around the shoreline offering a quite place for reflection. The forest is a richly varied one and features ruined Castles, WWII docks & buildings as well as ancient woodland. Be sure to pack a picnic and enjoy the panoramic views. 

Castle Caldwell

Castle Caldwell Forest (Rossergole Point Walk) 2.5 miles circular
Spectacular views await those who explore Castle Caldwell Forest. One of three routes this walk follows the lake and shore and takes in man-made and natural wonders, including a lime-kiln which hints at the association of the Caldwell estate with the nearby Belleek Pottery and the eerie ruins of Castle Caldwell.

Jetty Walk Ely Lodge

Ely Lodge Forest (Carrickreagh Jetty Walk) 1.3 miles linear (one way)
Sweeping up from the shores of Lower Lough Erne, one of the largest freshwater lakes in Ireland. Ely Lodge Forest is important nationally for its broadleaf woodland and biodiversity. Taking its name from the nearby Ely Lodge, one of two gate lodges that would have adorned the gates of the demesne of the Marquis of Ely, Nicholas Loftus, the Estate was the largest in Co. Fermagh during Victorian times. One of three routes in the forest, the blue waymarked route will take you on a path through a wooded landscape to Carrickreagh Jetty where on a calm day the mirror reflections on the lough are breathtaking.


Gortmaconnell Viewpoint Walk 1.2 miles linear (one way)
The summit of Gortmaconnell Rock can be reached by a short but rewarding climb contouring around the hill. The viewpoint offers wonderful 360 degree panoramic views of Cuilcagh Mountain, MacNean Valley and the Erne Lowlands. From here you can also see the Owenbrean River, which flows down from Cuilcagh Mountain before sinking underground, eventually reaching the Marble Arch Caves system.

Blackslee Waterfall

Lough Navar Forest (Blackslee Waterfall Walk) 4 miles circular
Lough Navar Forest is undoubtedly one of the jewels in the Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark. With 4 routes to choose from this walk along forest roads makes its way through the oldest part of Lough Navar Forest leading to the Blackslee Waterfall, where water cascades over a 20 metre cliff before continuing its journey down an undercut rocky gorge.

Walks over 5 milesCuilcagh Boardwalk

Culicagh Way (Legnabrocky Trail) 4.5 miles linear (one way)
Famous for its boardwalk and stairway to heaven, this route has been highly popular with walkers since it opened. This section of the greater 33km Cuilcagh Way meanders through one of the largest expanses of blanket bog in Northern Ireland. The trail follows quiet farmland track before traversing a wooden boardwalk that consists of a steady climb to the mountain face. Here a stepped boardwalk climbs through steep terrain and boulders fields before reaching the summit plateau. A rough mountain path negotiates the wild summit plateau for a few kilometres before reaching an ancient cairn. The imposing mountain flanks of Cuilcagh give this walk a very atmospheric feeling providing breathing views, the most impressive view is of Lough Atona, a lake nestled at the foot of the mountain which was carved out by the glacier during the last Ice Age approximately 13,000 years ago

Ballintempo Forest

Ballintempo Forest Aghanaglack Walk  7 miles circular
One of the largest sections of continuous forestry tracks in Northern Ireland, this forest is steeped in geology, local myths & wildlife; so there is something for everyone. The walk passes a classic Dual Court Tomb from the Neolithic period, an elevated site amongst the conifers, it was constructed when there were fewer surrounding trees, allowing for spectacular views across the area. As you walk, keep a look out for upland birds such as merlin and hen harrier, have a rest at the Brimstone Rock and take in stunning views of nearby Cuilcagh Mountain.

Carrigan Forest Lough Formal Walk

Carrigan Forest Lough Formal Walk 7 miles circular
This brisk walk is a chance to fill your lungs with mountain forest air while enjoying the views from the summit of Formal More. The route is almost all on forestry tracks with a short path through the heather. Spend some time taking in the views which include features of geological interest, you may be surprised at how much wildlife comes to you in this seemingly barren woodland. The most intriguing feature in the forest is Lough Formal, sitting at 240 metres above sea level this small mountain lake sits astride a fault (or crack) in the Earth`s crust.

Visit WalkNI for even more walks in the Geopark.

Latest comment posted by Ken Turkington on September 6, 2017 @ 10:15 PM

How do I get maps and exact locations of the various walks in the Marble Arch Geopark. Read more >

Jayne Woodrow
Jayne Woodrow  Marketing Executive

Jayne joined the marketing team of Outdoor Recreation NI in March 2014. She enjoys getting out and exploring the fantastic adventures on offer across Northern Ireland.

5 Things you didn't know about the Mourne Mountains

Posted on July 20, 2017 @ 4:25 PM in Walking

There is a saying "you learn something new everyday" and we did just that when we caught up with tour guide Peter Rafferety owner of Walkthemournes.com based in the beautiful Mourne Mountains. Peter really is a fountain of knowledge when it comes to interesting facts on this spectacular area and we couldn't wait to share with you these 5 interesting facts you may not have known about the Mournes. 

The Mourne Wall

Mourne Wall

You may find this hard to believe but this 22 mile long, 1.5m high and 0.8m thick wall, which took 18 years to build and crosses 15 mountains was constructed by hand! 

Built using classic dry stone wall techniques (no motar used!) and granite from local quarries, the wall which encloses 9,000 acres of mountainous terrain, was designed to keep farm animals away from the reservoirs and rivers. The wall passes the peak of each mountain except 'Rocky' where it skirts around the summit.

Carnivorous Plants

Carnivorous Plants Northern Ireland

Believe it or not the Mournes has 2 types of carnivorous plant the 'Butterwort' and the 'Sudew', but don't panic contrary to what some people had heard, these plants do NOT! eat humans and the sheep are also safe.

As the soil where these plants grow is so poor in nutrients they catch small flies and the dreaded midge to provide their food. Not easily spotted by the untrained eye but the Walk The Mournes guides can usually find some depending on the time of year.

Smugglers
Smugglers Northern Ireland

The Mournes was once a hiding place for some infamous smugglers.You may have seen clues to this if you have been to Bloody Bridge Car Park. 'The Smugglers Head' sculpture by artist Ralf Sander was inspired by the smuggling activitiy that was rife in the Mournes in the 18th & 19th Centuries. 

Ships would dock in Newcastle at the foot of the Mountains with their illegal proudce including coffee, tea, silk, tobaccco and wine before trekking their way through the Mournes on horseback along the Brandy Pad which crosses the top of the two valleys. But did you know they had a secret cave to store and hide their goods from customs men? Peter has lots of stories of their escapades hiding from the customs men and will take you into the hidden 'Smugglers Cave' to see where they hid! Certainly not for those of a nervous disposition you will have the opportunity to enter the cave and crawl along a ledge to a small chamber (hopefully Peter remembers the torch!).

Stone Cutting

Mourne Granite

Most people as they walk through the Mournes think what they see in front of them is the way it was left after the last ice age 10,000 years ago but nothing could be further from the truth. 

The Mourne Men are famous the world over for their great skill in working with stone, a skill that is not just learnt but bred into them. 150 years ago hundreds of men and boys toiled at cutting the Mourne Granite using only hand tools. The granite stone had many uses in the 18th & 19th centuries for buildings, millstones and was even used in cobbled streets, the stones of which were designed in such a way that that when horses hooves wore down the surface the cobble could be taken out, turned and replaced.

World War ll

Mournes World War 2

You may think that the Mournes had no connection with World War 2 but you will be amazed at the evidence you will find yourself walking on. Shrapnel remnants of bombing practice from off-shore American Navy ships from World War ll (70 years ago) still continue to be found here....don't worry though it's unlikely you'll come across any unexploded shells!

The aim of Walkthemournes.com is to help both visitors and locals discover and enjoy all the area has to offer. Some people find it a bit daunting to set out on their own so never actually get to experience the fantastic mountains. This is where Walk The Mournes guided tours are even more beneficial as people have the security of a professional qualified guide to look after them. To find out more about the tours offered check out their website: Walkthemournes.com, phone 028 4176 3297 or email: peter@walkthemournes.com.

Latest comment posted by Rodney Magowan on July 28, 2017 @ 10:11 PM

enjoyed this list of 5 - thanks apart from Americans shelling the Mournes the hills are also the site of many sad wartime crashes by allied aircraft, RAF, commonwealth, Polish etc. You may have ... Read more >

Jayne Woodrow
Jayne Woodrow  Marketing Executive

Jayne joined the marketing team of Outdoor Recreation NI in March 2014. She enjoys getting out and exploring the fantastic adventures on offer across Northern Ireland.

Walk Where You’ve Never Walked Before

Posted on June 19, 2017 @ 3:37 PM in AdventureWalking

For those in search of an epic Instagram photo or somewhere new to walk this summer, we share some exciting new trails which have opened in the spectacular Causeway Coast & Glens. Your chance to enjoy previously inaccessible spectacular views near Ballycastle and Cushendun, Co. Antrim this summer. 

Fairhead
Fairhead Northern Ireland

Those who come to explore the new trails at Fairhead are in for a treat this summer, with over 13 miles of trails to discover, you can expect stunning coastal views towards Ballycastle, Rathlin Island and the picturesque Murlough Bay from this ruggedly beautiful, wild and remote location.

Local myth states that it was at the iconic cliffs of Fairhead above the famous Sea of Moyle where the Children of Lir, were put under an evil spell, transforming them into swans to spend 900 years in exile from humanity. Composed of a rock called dolerite, the great cliffs of Fairhead were born out of volcanic activity some 60 million years ago. The upper half of the cliff is formed of gigantic columns which are up to 12 metres in diameter, some of which are separated from the rest of the cliff but still stand, despite their precarious nature.

The walks begin from a farm car park clearly signposted off the Fairhead Rd. With a range of walks to choose from ranging from 1.5 to 3.4 miles (all offering spectacular clifftop views) these fully waymarked trails are named according to their Irish placenames. Several interpretative panels are dotted along the routes to provide you with more information on the history and geology of the area. Choose between 5 routes

  • Lough Dubh Walk (Red Route) 1.5 mile
  • Casan an Loch Walk (Purple Route) 2.2 miles
  • An Belach Runda Walk (Green Route) 3.1 miles
  • Loch na Crannoige Walk (Blue Route) 3.3 miles
  • Murlough View Walk (Yellow Route) 2.9miles 

The walks are all interlinked meaning that you can return to the start at various points. Please be aware that sections of these walks are situated near a cliff edge and due care must be taken particularly during windy conditions and in poor visibility.  Weather conditions along the coast can change very quickly - so be prepared.  Although the walks are waymarked it is advised that you equip yourself with a map.  The walking routes pass through areas of open land and working farmland. Livestock may be present and ground conditions are often uneven, wet and mucky underfoot and as such walking boots are strongly recommended.  

Ronan's Way
Ronan's Way

Ronan's Way is a rare opportunity to access some of the most stunning scenery in the Glens of Antrim on foot. With over 8 miles of new trails developed this is a fantastic opportunity to experience the breathtaking scenery of the inspiring Glens landscape.  

The walks are located on the McAuley Farm, on a stretch of land in memory of Ronan McAuley, a true Glens man who had a dream that more people would explore and enjoy Glendun and the exquisite views of the land that he called home. A couple of benches situated along the routes mean you can sit back and admire the breathtaking views. The diversity of natural habitat (woodland, peatland, farmland and the river) in Glendun means that there is an abundance of wildlife to see. 

A truly inspiring landscape, there are four routes of varying lengths to explore each providing an opportunity to view across one of the nine Glens of Antrim and over the channel to the Mull of Kintyre in Scotland. Located in a glen all of the walks have climbs, but the views are worth it! Walking boots are strongly recommended as the ground can become mucky underfoot. All walks begin at the carpark off the Glendun Rd where a trailhead panel and waymarker posts will direct you to the following walking routes;

  • Green Loop, 0.9 miles
  • Yellow Loop, 1.2 miles
  • Blue Loop, 2.3 miles
  • Red Loop, 3.4 miles

Those looking to extend their time walking in the Glens can visit the nearby Cregagh Wood; a short 0.9 mile woodland walk worth a visit. The wood's tranquil and peaceful surroundings make this location an excellent home for Red Squirrels who can often be spotted running from branch to branch.   

Waterfoot Beach Walk
Waterfoot Beach

For those who do love to be beside the seaside, the new 1.6 mile beach boardwalk at Waterfoot near Cushendun is well worth exploring on a sunny day. 

Depending on tide levels, you can take a walk back on the beach or retrace your steps along the coastal path when you reach the end of the route. With two playparks along the way for the kids to explore this is an ideal family walk this summer before tucking into a BBQ/ picnic on the beach and paddling in the sea.

The walk looks out towards Red Bay Castle which projects out onto the headland just north of Glenariff and passes species rich grasslands. Feel free to walk through the wildflower meadow where you can spot yellow-rattle flower and small copper butterfly.

Don't forget to share your photos with us on social media using #WalkNI.

Latest comment posted by Valerie campion on July 3, 2017 @ 11:23 AM

I am visiting the area in sept for a weekend of walking , I am looking forward to taking some of the above walks . The area looks spectatulor . Read more >

Jayne Woodrow
Jayne Woodrow  Marketing Executive

Jayne joined the marketing team of Outdoor Recreation NI in March 2014. She enjoys getting out and exploring the fantastic adventures on offer across Northern Ireland.

Every Day in May!

Posted on May 24, 2017 @ 12:34 PM in Walking

Thomas Johnston talks about how he was inspired to get outside and active every day in May - be prepared to be inspired!  

In 2011 I reconnected with a cousin I hadn’t seen in years right around the time she was training for the 3 Peaks Cyclo-Cross race, which takes place in Yorkshire. After a couple of decades of not doing a great deal of exercise, except for some token efforts over the years at going to the gym, she inspired me to get out there again and I quickly rediscovered my love of running outdoors, in all weathers, at all times of the year. (I also bought a mountain bike but I really only have eyes for my running shoes.) I didn’t waste any time in entering the 2012 Belfast City Marathon, ticking off a long-held desire to “run a marathon” from my bucket list. In retrospect it was a foolish thing to do from a near-sitting start. It wasn’t a fast time and I got an injury that bothered me for a long time afterwards, but I still crossed the finish line! This led me on to taking part in Every Day in May, which I’ve been doing each year since 2013.


What is Every Day in May?

It’s a charity event designed to motivate people of all ages and abilities, wherever they are in the world, to go outside, to improve their fitness, and to raise money. Participants cover 5km or 10km each day during May using any self-powered means, such as walking, running, cycling, swimming, canoeing, and so on – anything so long as they are providing the power – with the emphasis being on the outdoors. To make it a more approachable event for people who don’t currently exercise they can split their activities over two sessions – it encourages people to get off the bus a stop or to earlier or to go out for a walk at lunch time. May is the perfect to do this because the days are getting longer, the weather is (hopefully) getting warmer and nature is positively exploding with activity. And being outdoors in nature is incredibly therapeutic.

In 2013 – still nursing my marathon injury – I mostly walked or cycled 5km. In subsequent years I overcame that injury and my running improved, so I was able to alternate between running and walking. This year my fitness has improved to the extent that I am able to run 10km each day. And my partner is also taking part for the first time this year – he’s walking at least 5km every day and, being the good citizen he is, he’s picking up any litter he passes along the way! He won’t mind me saying that he’s pretty darn fit for 73 years – which just proves the Every Day in May is indeed for everyone.

We’ve taken the opportunity to explore the countryside on our walks and runs. We live beside Delamont Country Park which has some of the best views you’ll see anywhere in Ireland; from the Millennium Stone you can look over Down Cathedral (where St Patrick is buried) to the Mournes in the distance and then follow the sweep of the county Down countryside over Gibbs Island and along Strangford Lough all the way down the Ards Peninsula. However, Delamont is pretty hilly so I tend to only run through rather than around it!

We’ve also been along the Quoile River several times, around the lake at Castlewellan, the Waterworks in Belfast (using their parkrun route), Rowallane Gardens in Saintfield, Castle Ward, along the road from Portrush to Dunluce Castle which has some spectacular coastal views as well through our picturesque home village of Killyleagh – famous as the birthplace of Sir Hans Sloane (founder of the British Museum) among many other luminaries. County Down in particular has some stunning places to be outdoors. We’re planning to run and walk along the Comber Greenway and wherever else our map leads us.

We’re doing it for charity

I don’t want to sound like I’m blowing my own trumpet – but it’s not easy running 10km each day for 31 consecutive days! It’s extremely tiring and it’s not something people should do as a matter of course. Your body doesn’t have time to fully recover  – but as a one-off event for charity it’s doable. Walking 5km each – for someone not used to that level of activity – is also a massive achievement and something within reach of almost everyone.

As well as the physical aspect it’s also a challenge trying to fit the activity into your day. Factor in the time it takes to get ready and then shower at the end and before you know it you have to find two hours out of every day in between work and family life.

One thing I’m very conscious of when I take part in Every Day in May is just how lucky I am and how much I sometimes take my health for granted. I’m lucky to be fit enough to be able to run 10km every day knowing that at the end of it all I can just stop, recover very quickly, and get on with my life. There are many people in the world who can’t “just stop” being ill – so me running 10km every day is my small way of showing support for those people less fortunate than myself by raising money for charity.

This year we’re supporting two causes:

NI Hospice, in memory of my mum. It's impossible to overestimate her importance in my life. It was difficult to see her health deteriorate, especially towards the end, but she never lost her spirit while her body was failing her. She passed away in 2015. During her illness she was helped by – and always spoke very highly of – the awesome people at Northern Ireland Hospice.

Down Cathedral Organ Appeal, in memory of Helen Walker. Helen passed away earlier this year. She's linked with mum in a sad sort of way because her funeral was the same day as mum's anniversary. Singing in the Down Cathedral choir was a big part of Helen's life and it's our privilege to raise money in her name so that others can continue to hear the organ’s uplifting sounds.

Go outside!

The best thing about running, or walking or jogging, is that you can quite literally do it anywhere. And it costs very little. You don’t need any fancy or expensive equipment – just running shoes, shorts and a t-shirt (all easily packable items), and you’re away, wherever you happen to find yourself. I find it very therapeutic too. If something is bothering me I think about it when I’m out there and by the time I come back it’s resolved or I’ll know what to do to get past it.

Simply going outdoors and listening to the sounds of nature and life passing by (I can’t listen to music when I’m running – too distracting!) is enough to fill up my soul-meter. So my advice to you is Go Outside!

Sarah Nelson
Sarah Nelson  Marketing Officer

Sarah joined the marketing team of Outdoor Recreation NI in 2011. A firm believer in giving anything a go at least once (unless it involves jumping out of a plane at 6,000ft!) she is always looking for new adventures in the outdoors and can often be found wandering the Mournes or Glens of Antrim attempting not to get lost!

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