Ulster Way Highlights- The Sliabh Beagh Way

Posted on January 29, 2018 @ 5:47 PM in Walking

In the second blog in the 'Ulster Way Highlights Series' we move west from the Mournes to explore the spectacular Sliabh Beagh Way, as it meanders through the valleys of Co. Tyrone, the drumlins of Co. Monaghan and the lakelands of Co. Fermanagh.

Sliabh Beagh Way

Steeped in local myth and legend, the 40mile two-day route, follows a mixture of country laneways and forest tracks, as it explores the varied countryside around South Fermanagh. A remote path across the expanse of moore around Sliabh Beagh is one of the highlights, while good signage and generally firm terrain make it suitable for fit walkers with experience walking in the hills.

Walking The Sliabh Beagh Way

Sliabh Beagh Way

Day 1: Aughnacloy to Muckle (via St Patrick's Well & Chair), 18 miles (29.5km)
Crossing over the River Blackwater at Aughnacloy, the first half of this route crosses back and forth between Co. Fermanagh and Co. Cavan in the Republic of Ireland on country roads, forest track and moorland trails. One of the highlights of this section is St Patricks Well & Chair, which we highly recommend taking a short detour to explore. The moss-cloaked stones, make this an evocative place and it is tempting to linger a while to soak up the atmosphere. From here the trail leads to a high moorland viewpoint, where you will be rewarded with fantastic views of Lough More and the open peat-cloaked hillsides, which surround Sliabh Beagh. The final section of this day concludes, with a walk along a remote path crossing the expanse of moore around the lower slopes of Sliabh Beagh towards Muckle Rocks.

Sliabh Beagh Way

Day 2: Muckle Rocks to Lisnaskea, 22 miles (35.8km)
The 2nd day of walking begins at Muckle Rocks, following country lanes to Mullaghfad Forest; passing Mullaghfad Parish Church, a remote, stone church with an external bell dating back to 1836. The route meanders along the shores of several upland lakes; a haven for wildlife throughout the year. If it is a warm day, the placid waters of these lakes provide a pleasant place to take a break. Follow the trail as it descends to meet the road at Eshywulligan before climbing along a moorland road. Good views are afforded across the surrounding countryside; from points where the slopes are free of trees. The final section of this route from Tully Forest to Lisnaskea follows a series of country lanes, winding gently towards the finish.

Did you know?

Just north of the forest at Muckle Rocks, lies Shane Barnagh's Lough and a nearby outcrop of sandstone known as Shane Barnagh's Stables. The name recalls an outlaw, who roamed across Northern Ireland in the 17th century used the rocks to hide stolen livestock; rumours persist of a horde of undiscovered treasure still buried beneath the lough.

Where To Stay

There is a wide range of walker friendly accomodation in close proximity to the route. More information can be found on page 16 of the Sliabh Beagh Way Walkers Guide.

Where To Eat

After a hard days walking, some good food and drink is a must. The area is home to an extensive range of eateries catering for all tastes. For recommendations, of where to eat in the Sliabh Beagh area please contact the Killymaddy or Fermanagh Visitor Information Centres

Getting Around

There are a number of ways in which you can travel around Aughnacloy and Lisnaskea. The rural bus network links Dungannon, Enniskillen, Fivemiletown, Augher and Clougher, to the start and finish of the route. For route information and times, check out the Translink website or phone (028) 9066 6630. There are also a number of local taxi services, further details of this can be found on page 19 of the Sliabh Beagh Way Walkers Guide.

Sliabh Beagh Way

Please be aware that this walking route passes through areas of open land such as hillside, working farmland and working forests. Livestock may be present, ground conditions may be uneven or wet underfoot and all forestry signage should be adhered to. Please refer to the ‘Walk Safely and Responsibly’ Guide.

Although this walk is waymarked walkers are always advised to carry the relevant map and ensure they are prepared for changeable weather.

You can read our first blog 'Ulster Way Highlights- The Mourne Way' where we share details, of a marvellously varied two-day walking route from coast to coast across the edge of the Mourne Mountains. 

Jayne Woodrow
Jayne Woodrow  Marketing Officer & Active Clubs Coordinator for Walking

Jayne joined the marketing team of Outdoor Recreation NI in March 2014. She oversees the marketing and communication on WalkNI, OutdoorNI and Walking in Your Community Project. Most recently she has been working with Parkrun Ireland & UK to introduce the 'Walk @ parkrun' initiative.

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